Welcome pack

Managed isolation facility for returnees to New Zealand

"Amohia ake te ora o te iwi, kia puta ki te wheiao"
The wellbeing of the people is paramount.

Nā H.M Kiingi Tuheitia Pootatau Te Wherowhero VII

This tongikura was gifted to MIQ from the King and guides us through our effort to keep you and Aotearoa New Zealand safe.

Nau mai, haere mai: welcome

Kia ora, welcome to New Zealand, it’s good to have you here.

While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to grow around the world, in Aotearoa New Zealand we went hard and early to limit the impacts of COVID-19 in our communities. This included a strict nationwide lockdown and working through our 4-level COVID-19 Alert system.

New Zealand currently has very few COVID-19 cases and we’re trying to keep it that way. To help us continue keeping the country safe, we have implemented a system of Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ).

Having recently arrived from overseas means you are at risk of carrying the virus and potentially bringing it into New Zealand. This means you will need to stay in a managed isolation facility for at least 14 days.

If there is a reason to believe you have been exposed to COVID-19 you will be placed in a quarantine facility for at least 10 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms or since the date of your test

(if you never developed symptoms). You must be clear of COVID-19 symptoms for a minimum of 72 hours before you can leave.

Staying in managed isolation is a legal requirement under the COVID-19 Public Health Response (Isolation and Quarantine) Order 2020.

These facilities are hotels where you will be given extensive support throughout your stay. We will do all we can to make your stay as pleasant as possible. While you are here please be kind to hotel, health and other staff and follow their advice, guidance and directions.

The facilities operate under an Alert Level 4 environment. This means there are strict conditions on anyone who is staying here. Although this facility is a hotel, it is not functioning as a hotel would usually. A number of the COVID-19 rules that you are expected to follow are legal requirements, and breaching these rules may lead to Police action. If you don't follow the rules, there may be consequences such as additional time in isolation.

This document has information you’ll find useful during your stay. It is updated regularly and changes may be made during your stay.

The dedicated on-site staff are there to help you. Please talk to them if you have questions or concerns about any aspect of your stay.

Kia kaha and thanks for doing your bit.

He whakapānga - Contacts

You should contact the on-site team first with any queries or concerns. There are other places you can go for information:

MIQ, fees and exemptions:

The managed isolation and quarantine website

For information on alert levels, restrictions and support:

COVID-19 website(external link)

For COVID-19 related health information:

COVID-19 health information(external link)

Immigration-related matters

Including the border exception process and individual immigration cases:

Immigration New Zealand website(external link)

For foreign nationals

If you are a foreign national you can contact your Embassy, High Commission or Consulate to seek consular assistance when in New Zealand: 

Find an Embassy or foreign representative in New Zealand on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade website(external link)

Reporting an issue

If you believe someone isn’t sticking to the rules or is behaving in a way that is likely to spread COVID-19, please report it to the on-site team – you can also report any issue on the COVID-19 website(external link).

Throughout your stay, you have the right to consult a lawyer at your own expense (see information about your rights in Appendix 3).

What is managed isolation?

A number of facilities in New Zealand have been set up by the government to manage the isolation of people arriving from overseas. This is a measure at our border to ensure people who enter

New Zealand at this time do not introduce COVID-19 into the community.

Managed isolation facilities are safe and there is plenty of support for you and your whānau. They accommodate people who have been assessed as being at low risk of having COVID-19. The managed isolation facilities are hotels, staffed by a team of health professionals, hotel and government personnel.

Most people will spend 14 days in managed isolation.

Since March 2020, over 80,000 people have successfully been through managed isolation and quarantine and have come safely into the community.

Why you need to go into managed isolation

COVID-19 can spread from person to person. Having recently arrived from overseas means you may be at a risk of carrying the virus. You may not become sick immediately and symptoms take time to develop.

Staying in a managed isolation facility for a minimum 14-day period allows us to isolate you in case you are incubating the disease. During this time you will not be allowed to leave the facility.

When can you leave?

You are legally required to stay in a managed isolation facility for a minimum of 14 days. This starts from the time and date you arrive in New Zealand.

In almost all cases a negative COVID-19 test and confirmation from a Medical Officer of Health or a Health Protection Officer that you are a low risk of having or transmitting COVID-19 are needed before you can leave the facility.

Low risk of having or transmitting COVID-19 includes confirming you:

  • have been in managed isolation for at least 14 days
  • do not have a temperature of 38°C or higher
  • in almost all cases, tested negative for COVID-19

You can be required to stay up to a total of 28 days if you refuse a COVID-19 test or are not considered a low risk by a health practitioner.

You must meet these criteria to leave the facility. You will also need to complete a Managed Isolation Exit Form. A nurse will help you with this and sign it off. Once you finish all requirements you will receive a letter confirming you have completed managed isolation.

REMEMBER: We are in this together and we are committed to making your stay as comfortable as possible. There are ways to let us know if you have issues or concerns during your stay. Talk to the on-site team first. They are there to help.

You can also report any person you believe isn’t sticking to the rules, or is behaving in a way that is likely to spread COVID-19. Visit the COVID-19 website(external link).

Rātaka – Calendar of activities

Day 0

Arrive at the facility.

Start your stay at the managed isolation facility.

COVID-19 test within 24 hours of your arrival (except for returnees from excluded countries - Australia, Antarctica and some Pacific Islands).

Day 1

Health and wellbeing assessment.

Health staff conduct a comprehensive health and wellbeing check to ensure you have everything you need for your stay.

Day 2 onwards

Daily health check and regular wellbeing monitoring. Discuss your travel plans for after your isolation period.

Day 3 and day 12

COVID-19 tests: you will be tested for COVID-19 on or about these days.

*If your test is positive you will be told by health staff. They will explain what happens next.

Day 14

Complete your stay and exit the facility.

If your tests are negative and you are assessed as being low risk of having or transmitting COVID-19, you will be formally approved to leave the facility.

Post-departure

In the week following your departure you will be contacted by the Ministry of Health to check your ongoing health.

Kia kaha and thank you for doing your bit

Services in your facilities

Food

Your breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided. Any additional food will need to be paid for.

Let the on-site team know if you have any food allergies or medical conditions that require special diets.

There may be online options to order food and have it delivered to you.

Speak to the on-site team about local delivery options.

Medical care

A team of health professionals are always available at your facility.

Contact the hotel reception and ask for a nurse to help you with your health concerns. The health staff will also be able to assist with any medication and prescription requirements.

In an emergency

All facilities have a specific emergency plan you should follow in an emergency. Please familiarise yourself with it and do as the on-site staff request.

It is an offence to knowingly cause a false fire alarm, and doing so will result in prosecution. Maintain a physical distance of 2 metres from others and wear the masks that are supplied to you during any evacuation.

Laundry

Laundry services are available during your stay. Talk to hotel staff or the on-site team for the services specific to your facility.

In-room telephone services (landlines) and Wi-Fi

Internal calling, between rooms and for hotel services, is free.

External calling is charged at hotel rates (per minute). Talk to hotel staff to enable the service.

Wi-Fi is free. Talk to hotel staff for details. We recommend using internet- based calling apps like FaceTime, Messenger and WhatsApp if you want to avoid telephone in-room charges.

Māori Pharmacists free phone line

Ngā Kaitiaki o Te Puna Rongoā o Aotearoa – the Māori Pharmacists Association (MPA) has a free phone line to answer questions that kaumātua or whānau may have about their medicines.

Call 0800 664 688 and leave your contact details. A Māori pharmacist will call you back for a kōrero within 24 hours.

Talk to the on-site health staff if you need urgent medical advice.

CCTV in MIQ facilities

For your safety, CCTV may be in operation within your facility. The CCTV cameras are located in all public areas and stairwells. Cameras are not installed in any guest rooms.

Smoking in the facility

Smoking is not allowed inside your room. Designated smoking areas are provided in each facility, depending on available space. There may be time limits on smoking areas and you may be escorted while smoking. If needed, your facility will let you know how to book a slot for smoking.

While smoking you need to physically distance from others not in your bubble. All smoking areas are monitored. The nursing team can provide resources to help you quit smoking.

Translation services

If you require an interpreter, please talk to the on-site team and they can arrange this for you.

If you or any person in your bubble need assistance, please talk to the on-site team or call the hotel reception.

Restrictions apply

Staying in a managed isolation facility is an important measure to keep New Zealand safe and protected from further transmission of COVID-19. There are some rules and guidance on what you can and cannot do while staying in a facility.

Stay in your room

You must stay in your room unless you have a medical appointment or in an emergency. Your facility will inform you about how to book in for exercise or smoking.

When you leave your room, you must wear face masks that have been supplied to you. The use of reusable masks and other face coverings is not fit for purpose when you are in an isolation facility.

No visitors at the facility

Family or friends cannot visit you. You should not have any visitors in your room at any time. Please do not enter the hotel room of anyone who is not in your bubble.

The hotel offers free Wi-Fi. Stay in touch with your family and friends through other communication methods such as making phone calls or using apps like Zoom, SKYPE, etc.

Interacting with the media

There is high public interest in the managed isolation and quarantine facilities. Media might contact you and it is your choice whether you talk to them.

Please remember journalists cannot enter the hotel. If you agree to an interview, you will need to use remote options such as phone or video calling.

No photography, filming or audio recording without permission

Please respect the privacy and personal circumstances of people at this facility when considering whether to take photos, audio or video recordings.

Please do not record other guests without asking them first. If you want to record your interactions with staff, please speak with them first.

Delivery of food and goods

You cannot leave the facility, but you can have items delivered to your facility - this includes food or personal packages.

Deliveries can not contain any illegal items or items that present a health and safety risk. This includes electrical cooking appliances, gas cookers, candles, heaters, toasters, grill top ovens, items with naked flames, and combustibles. If staff believe that your delivery contains any items that present a health and safety risk they may ask for proof that it is safe.

If you do have an item that presents a health and safety risk, the hotel can hold this for you until you depart or return it to the sender.

Alcohol deliveries are allowed

Please order reasonable quantities only for personal consumption. Please drink responsibly, be considerate of other returnees and staff and ensure your behaviour is appropriate. You must be able to respond to staff or an emergency (such as a fire evacuation) as well as follow PPE and physical distancing rules - alcohol may affect your ability to keep you and others safe.

The Ministry of Health guidelines recommend two standard drinks a day for women (no more than 10 standard drinks a week) and three standard drinks a day for men (no more than 15 standard drinks a week).

Low-risk alcohol drinking advice(external link) — Alcohol.org website

We limit delivery of alcohol to:

  • six 330ml cans of beers (6-9 standard drinks), or
  • one bottle of wine (7-8 standard drinks) per day, or
  • four pack, up to 330ml each, of RTDs (7-8 standard drinks)
  • deliveries of spirits will not be accepted.

If you have more than this delivered, with the intention of consuming it over a number of days, your delivery will be held by staff and provided to you over your stay.

If you or those in your bubble need support and treatment to reduce their alcohol intake, call the Alcohol Drug Helpline on 0800 787 797.

Te Whare Tapa Whā - The Māori holistic model of health

The Māori holistic model of health, Te Whare Tapa Whā, reminds you to take care of all the different aspects of your life to support your wellbeing.

Te whare tapa whā is a model of the 4 dimensions of wellbeing developed by Sir Mason Durie in 1984 to provide a Māori perspective on health. With 4 walls, the wharenui (meeting house) is a symbol of these four dimensions. The wharenui’s connection with the whenua (land) forms the foundation for the other four dimensions.

By nurturing and strengthening all dimensions, you support your health and wellbeing, as well as the health and wellbeing of your whānau.

Monitoring your health regularly

While you are in managed isolation you will receive regular health checks. Checks and testing are vital for your wellbeing and for others around you. It also helps us provide you with medical treatment if you’ve been exposed to the virus or have other health concerns.

Please cooperate fully with staff. They are there to care for you and ensure health checks are effective.

If you are travelling from Australia, Antartica or some Pacific Islands, you will be tested at least twice for COVID-19

Day 3: The first COVID-19 test is around day 3 as the average time most people develop infection after exposure is 5 days, and we account for 2 days of travel.

Day 12: We then test again around day 12 as the infection may take longer to develop in some people. This second test is also one of the checks we use to determine if a person is low risk and can leave the facility after 14 days. 

If you are travelling from the UK or USA you will be tested 3 times for COVID-19.

Testing involves having a swab taken from the back of your nose. This can be a bit uncomfortable but is not known to cause harm. It takes 10 seconds to collect the sample. Children are treated the same as adults for testing. The only exception is that infants under 6 months of age are not required to undergo nasopharyngeal testing, unless they are symptomatic or close contacts of a confirmed or probable case. In all cases, clinical discretion can apply.

See Appendix one for more information on testing and results.

You should follow instructions from the Medical Officer of Health or Health Protection Officer during your stay. As well as COVID-19 testing, you will also be required to have a medical assessment. If asked to wear personal protective equipment (PPE) such as face masks (supplied to you) at any time during your stay, you must do so.

If you refuse a COVID-19 test or are not considered low risk, your stay could be up to 28 days.

Extra COVID-19 tests for returnees from other countries

Anyone travelling to New Zealand from the US and the UK are currently required to undergo day 0/1 testing within 24 hours of arriving at a managed isolation and quarantine facility.

From 18 January, people arriving in New Zealand from all destinations except Australia, Antarctica and some Pacific islands will also be required to:

  • have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’ within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility
  • remain in your room until the results of the test is known

If you are symptomatic on arrival, you will go straight to a quarantine facility.

If the result of your day zero test is positive, you will be transferred to a quarantine facility. If you test negative, you will need to continue the remainder of your 14 days managed isolation stay at your facility as normal. You will be tested again on day 3 and day 12.

If you have any symptoms

It is important you are honest about your health during your stay in managed isolation. This is the best way your health needs and wellbeing can be managed. A team of health professionals is always available at your facility.

  • If you are feeling unwell, please stay in your room and phone the on-site team. They will advise what to do next.
  • If at any point during your stay you develop any of the COVID-19 symptoms of fever, cough, shortness of breath or sore throat, please stay in your room and let on-site staff know immediately by phone. They will arrange for you to be assessed by the on-site health professional.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases

When a case of COVID-19 in the facility is confirmed, the people involved are isolated before being transferred to a quarantine facility. If anyone in your facility is suspected of having COVID-19, you will be asked to stay in your room until otherwise advised. We appreciate this might be upsetting but your safety is our priority.

Remember to keep a physical distance of 2 metres from others during your stay so as to avoid making close contact with anyone outside your bubble.

Staying safe and healthy

By staying in managed isolation, you are joining the fight against COVID-19, stopping the spread, breaking the chain and saving lives.

While you’re in isolation, it’s important to follow some basic rules to help you stay safe and healthy. Movement outside your room is allowed only in a strictly controlled manner. Please respect and follow the protocols, guidance and directions of staff at your facility.

Wash. Wash. Wash.

Wash your hands with soap and water often (for at least 20 seconds) and  dry thoroughly or sanitise your hands regularly.

Avoid touching your face, including your eyes, nose, and mouth if your hands are not clean. Surfaces may have infectious droplets.

The elbow rule

Cough or sneeze into your elbow or cover your mouth and nose with tissues. Put them in a bin immediately and sanitise your hands.

No entry

Do not enter the hotel room of anyone who is not in your bubble.

Only interact with people in your bubble.

The 2-metre rule

Always maintain 2 metres distance from others except those who are in your bubble (your family/partner).

COVID-19 is spread by droplets, so keeping away from others and following good hygiene protects you and others from any spread of COVID-19.

Please dispose of all personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves and masks in the appropriate bins located near the PPE stations. Do NOT leave PPE lying around.

Wear face masks

Wear face masks (single-use) that have been supplied to you at all times when outside your room. A mask is also to be worn when someone needs to enter your room for testing or any maintenance. This includes opening the door to receive food or give laundry.

More information on safe handling of masks is available further on page 37 and 38 in the document.

Exercise in your rooms where possible

Exercise sessions or areas may be available in your facility. Exercise will be supervised and at a low intensity level to reduce perspiration and heavy breathing. Your facility will inform

you if you need to book a slot for exercising.

You will need to wear single-use face masks and maintain 2 metres distance from others.

If you are unwell you must contact the on-site health team to discuss options for exercise.

Smoke alarms keep you safe

Your room has a smoke alarm to keep you safe. Smoke alarms can be activated by dust, steam, smoke and other fumes and vapours. It is an

offence to knowingly cause a false fire alarm, and doing so will likely result in prosecution.

  • Do not smoke or vape inside your rooms.
  • Do not cook in your room.
  • Do not overload plugs.
  • Do not place towels or flammable materials on heaters to dry.

If the fire alarm activates, follow the evacuation procedure and listen to the instructions of hotel staff and management. Remember to stay 2 metres away from others and wear a mask during any evacuation.

Looking after your mental health and wellbeing

It is normal to not feel right all the time during this period of isolation. It’s not easy to come to New Zealand and be unable to do what you want straight away. It’s understandable to feel sad, distressed, worried, confused, or anxious.

These are difficult and challenging times. Everyone will respond differently: some may find it harder than others. So, it’s important to look after your mental health, as well as your physical health.

To help you get through in the best possible way, we've come up with a few simple tips.

It’s okay to reach out

It’s okay if you’re taking things day by day. He waka eke noa – we're all in this together.

Many tāngata/people find that having a kōrero or talanoa/conversation with a support person can really help.

Your onsite team of registered nurses are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to support you, if you begin to worry about you or your whānau/s physical or mental wellbeing or have any specific health needs. You can also access a mental health clinician at your facility with the support of your onsite registered nurses if needed.

We’ve put together a list of helpful services you can reach out to, website and apps you can use to look after your wellbeing.

Telephone and text-based support

1737

Call or text 1737 for support with grief, anxiety, distress or mental wellbeing. This service is free, and you can call anytime, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Lifeline

Call 0800 543 354 or text HELP (4357) to talk to a counsellor or trained volunteers.

Samaritans

Call 0800 726 666 for someone who will listen.

Depression Helpline

Call 0800 111 757 or free text 4202 to talk to a trained counsellor.

Asian family services

Call 0800 862 34 to access help in ten languages, including Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Vietnamese, Thai, Japanese, Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi and English.

The helpline provides nationwide free and confidential services from Monday to Friday between 9am-8pm.

Alcohol Drug Helpline

Call 0800 787 797 or free text 8681 or online chat at alcoholdrughelp.org.nz for support with alcohol or other drug problems.

OUTLine NZ

Call 0800 688 5463 for confidential, free LGBTIQ+ support from a trained volunteer. This service is available from 6pm to 9pm every evening.

Online mental wellbeing tools

Mentemia

Daily mental wellbeing, Coping with uncertainty, stress, worry, sleep, thriving

The Mentemia app provides mental wellbeing coaching after getting to know you a little through a personality quiz and what focus areas you have, like sleeping better, stressing less, or helping support a loved one. The videos feature Sir John Kirwan and his ways of approaching life that help him on a day to day basis.

www.mentemia.com(external link)

Melon

Loneliness and isolation, Understanding ourselves better, Behaviour change, Ways to manage mood, Strategies to manage anxiety

Melon has an online community where you can anonymously interact with others on a similar journey and connect with a team of support workers. There’s also a health journal, resources, wellbeing exercises and webinars. He waka eke noa (We’re all in this together).

www.melonhealth.com(external link)

Just a thought

Anxiety and stress, Confidence, Self-awareness, Problem solving skills, Connecting to what matters, Sleep, Relaxation

Staying on Track is a free online course that helps you learn how to cope with worry and stress when things get tough. Get access to easy-to

use, proven strategies and skills you would learn from a therapist, in the privacy of your own home, anytime that suits you.

www.justathought.co.nz/covid19(external link)

Getting through Together

Getting Through Together is a mental wellbeing campaign focused on things we can all do to maintain our mental wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with practical tips for looking after yourself and your whānau. www.allright.org.nz(external link)

Sparklers

Sparklers at Home is an online toolkit for parents, full of fun activities that support the wellbeing of primary and intermediate students.

www.sparklers.org.nz(external link)

Whakatau Mai

The Wellbeing Sessions are free, online, community events you can join in real-time. Visit the website to register for sessions to support your wellbeing and connect with other like-minded people.

www.wellbeingsessions.nz(external link)

The Ministry of Health

The Ministry of Health’s website has information, resources, tools and free apps to support your mental wellbeing, as well as information about organisations that can help if you need extra support.

www.health.govt.nz/covid-19-mental-wellbeing(external link)

Support for children and young people's mental health and wellbeing

The Lowdown

Call 0800 111 757 or text 5626

Youthline

Call 0800 376 633 or text 234 or use the webchat option(external link) between 7pm to 10pm.

Kidsline (for those under 18)

Call 0800 54 37 54

If you are under 18, we will help you and your whānau/parents/guardian to make your stay comfortable and safe. There may be some special provisions available, for example to enable school work.

You can access Home Learning TV at tvnz.co.nz on-demand(external link). There are over 300 episodes that have lessons designed for all early learning and school ages. There's also a range of learning and wellbeing resources at learningfromhome.govt.nz(external link)

You can also apply to have a parent or guardian join you in managed isolation through the exemption process. Information about exemptions is on page 30 in this pack.

Support to feel safe from violence

New Zealand takes family violence and sexual violence seriously. No-one should feel scared or be harmed by others. Help is available for all adults and children.

New Zealand Police

If you’re in immediate danger call the Police on 111. If you’re unable to talk, listen for the option to dial 55 – this will put you directly through to the Police.

Family violence it's not OK

It’s not OK family violence helpline

The family violence information line 0800 456 450 provides information and is available 7 days a week, from 9am to 11pm.

Safe to talk

A national sexual harm helpline accessible via phone and internet. Call 0800 044 334

Welfare support

There is help available if you need essential information or support services, including applying for financial assistance (and other support you may need).

The Ministry of Social Development can help in lots of different ways and situations. You can also ask on-site staff to refer you. It's a good idea to consider your options early in your stay so that assistance is available if you need it when you leave the facility.

Work and Income

Employment

If you’re needing work when you leave the facility, there are online tools that connect employers with people looking for work.

When you find a job you’re interested in there’s help for you to apply or talk to the employer. There’s also help available with training and work experience, with your CV, cover letter or filling out applications.

For more information, visit: www.jobs.govt.nz(external link) or www.workandincome.govt.nz/work(external link)

Housing

Everyone deserves to have somewhere safe and healthy to live.

If you have nowhere to go when you leave isolation there may be help available to help you find somewhere to live. Contact the Ministry of Social Development riqc@msd.govt.nz

For any other information please visit the Work and Income website(external link).

Ministry of Social Development

Financial

If you don’t have a job or can’t work in the near future, you may be able to get a benefit or some financial help.

For more information on what financial support you might get, visit check.msd.govt.nz(external link)

Travel costs

There may be help available if you need support with travel costs to get home. You don’t have to be on a benefit. Email us at riqc@msd.govt.nz

Tax information from IRD

Head to www.ird.govt.nz(external link) to find out more about what we do now and how we may be able to help you settle back in. MyIR is our secure online service and it can be used to do things like updating your contact details, filing your tax returns and sending us messages, most Kiwis now have myIR. If you haven't already registered for myIR, here's how www.ird.govt.nz/topics/myir-secure-online-services(external link)

If you're a citizen of NZ or Australia/have NZ Residency and are present in NZ and you have children under the age of 18 in your care, you may qualify for Working for Families payments to help you raise a family. See www.ird.govt.nz/working-for-families(external link) for more details. For receiving or paying Child Support, see www.ird.govt.nz/child-support(external link)

Managed isolation charges

The Government recovers some of the costs for managed isolation to share the financial load in a way that fairly reflects the benefits to both the New Zealand public of having a robust system, and those who leave and enter the country.

Find out about charges for managed isolation

Leaving an isolation facility after 14 days

You are required to stay in the isolation facility for a minimum of 14 days.

Have a travel plan in place

It’s important you are clear about where you will go when you’ve completed your stay at the managed isolation facility. On-site staff will ask you for your travel plans before you leave.

  • Be clear about where you will go next and how you’ll get there.
    • This helps us understand the time you’re leaving, so we can organise check-out and better support you during your departure.
  • Transport to the airport is available
    • We will transport you back to the airport you arrived at, if you wish, unless you indicate otherwise.
  • You will need to arrange your own transport from this facility to your next accommodation
    • If you are unable to organise your travel, please contact the on-site staff for advice.
  • Talk to us if you are unsure of your destination
    • If you do not have an appropriate destination to go to, please talk to on-site staff who may be able to assist or refer you to Government agencies that can help.

Please keep the on-site team informed if your accommodation or travel plans change at any stage during your stay. See Appendix 2 for more info.

Exiting the facility

In almost all cases a negative COVID-19 test and confirmation from a health practitioner that you are a low risk of having or transmitting COVID-19 are needed before you can leave.

You can be required to stay up to a total of 28 days if you refuse a COVID-19 test or are not considered a low risk by a health practitioner.

Low risk of having or transmitting COVID-19 includes confirming you have:

  • Been in managed isolation for at least 14 days
  • No symptoms consistent with COVID-19, which includes sore throat, cough, or difficulty breathing/shortness of breath
  • You do not have a temperature of 38°C or higher
  • In almost all cases, tested negative for COVID-19

You must meet these criteria to leave the facility and receive a letter confirming you have completed managed isolation. You will also need to complete a Managed Isolation Exit Form. A nurse will help you with this and sign it off.

You will travel to your next destination as per your agreed travel plans.

After you leave the facility

Keep track of where you've been

Please continue to keep a watch on New Zealand’s COVID-19 alert levels and abide by any requirements around physical distancing, hand hygiene and use of PPE, once you leave the facility.

More information about alert levels can be found here: www.covid19.govt.nz/alert-system(external link)

Remember to track your movements using the NZ COVID Tracer app.

If you do not use the app, use whatever method works for you, like the NZ COVID Tracer booklet. Encourage your family, whānau and friends to do the same.

We recommend you keep track of the 3 Ws:

  • Where you went.
  • When you went there - date and time
  • Who you met.

Monitor your health after you leave

In the week after you leave, the Ministry of Health will contact you to check on your health. They will do this by email, or phone if you have not completed the email survey.

If you have any follow up questions or queries regarding your health or develop any symptoms of COVID-19, please call Healthline on 0800 358 5453 or your GP.

For any emergencies call 111.

QUICK REMINDER: The symptoms of COVID-19 are :

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or blocked nose
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste

If you feel you are not coping, it is important to talk with a health professional. If you need more information, visit www.health.govt.nz/covid-19(external link).

Exemptions from managed isolation

Permission to leave managed isolation is only issued in very limited circumstances for exceptional reasons and where the public health risk is assessed to be very low and can be managed. Generally, a negative day 3 and day 12 COVID-19 test and a full health assessment are needed in order to be considered for an exemption. It may be harder to get an exemption if you leave from, or have recently been to, a country where the COVID-19 health risks are high.

There are currently four exemption application types available via the online application process: Transit Passenger; Medical Exemption; Joining Someone in Managed Isolation; and Exceptional Circumstances. Applications are considered on a case-by-case basis and the threshold for approval is very high. In a number of circumstances, a successful application is likely to result in a managed pass-out for a period of time rather than complete exemption.

Find out more about the exemptions process and how to apply for an exemption

If you are given an exemption to leave managed isolation, you will still need to complete a minimum 14 days of isolation from the time you arrived in New Zealand.

No exemption will be possible if you develop symptoms of COVID-19 during your stay in managed isolation and have been moved to a quarantine hotel.

What are my health rights?

In New Zealand, whenever you use health or disability services you have rights that must be upheld.
These rights are described in The Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights (The Code) and are summarised below.

You have the right:

  1. To be treated with respect
  2. To be treated fairly
  3. To dignity and independence
  4. To receive good care and support that suits your needs
  5. To be told things in a way you understand
  6. To be told everything you need to know about your care and support
  7. To make choices about your care and support
  8. To have support
  9. To decide if you want to be part of training, teaching or research
  10. To make a complaint

Read more about The Code and your rights(external link)

There are two important things to be aware of:

  1. The legal COVID-19 Orders which require you to stay at this facility also require you to be tested for COVID-19. Because testing is required by law, some aspects of the above Code are limited.
  2. The Code applies to the health services you receive in this facility. It does not apply to other aspects of being in the facility, or to the requirement to stay in this facility for 14 days.Please read through The Code and contact the health staff at your facility if you have any questions, or contact the following numbers for independent advice:
    • The Nationwide Health and Disability Advocacy Service: 0800 555 050
    • The Health and Disability Commissioner: 0800 11 22 33

Appendix 1: COVID-19 testing information

It is important you read or have explained to you the COVID-19 testing information below. Talk to the health professionals on-site if you have any concerns.

What happens when I am tested for COVID-19?

  • You will be asked to fill out a form or answer questions including your contact details.
  • You will have a swab taken from the back of your nose; this can be a bit uncomfortable but is not known to cause harm. It takes about 10 seconds to collect the sample.
  • You should let the person taking the swab know if you have any condition that reduces the strength of your skin, affects the ability of your blood to form clots, or if you are on blood thinning medication. If you have any of these conditions they may decide not to proceed with the test as your health is the primary concern.
  • Results may take a couple of days to come back.
  • There is no cost for the test.
  • You will continue your standard isolation requirements while you wait for your test result.

What happens if my result is negative?

  • If your test result is negative, you will be notified via text message or a phone call, or by the on-site nursing team.
  • If the test was around day 0/1 or day 3 you’ll need to continue with your managed isolation stay at this facility.
  • If the test was around day 12 you’ll also be assessed to confirm if you’re low risk of having or transmitting COVID-19 and able to leave the facility once your 14-day period is complete.
  • Having a negative test means that COVID-19 was not detected at the time you were tested. It may still show up later in your stay so it’s important to continue good hygiene and isolation measures throughout the duration of your time in managed isolation.

What happens if my result is positive?

  • If you have a confirmed positive result you will be contacted in person.
  • You may be moved to another facility or area and will be required to quarantine. While this may feel distressing, you will receive a high level of clinical care from a dedicated team of health professionals.
  • Any other people or family members you have been in contact with during your stay will also need to be moved for closer monitoring.
  • You will stay in the quarantine facility or area for at least 10 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms or since the date of your test (if you never developed symptoms). You must be clear of COVID-19 symptoms for a minimum of 72 hours before you can leave.
  • Your minimum total stay in a managed facility will still be 14 days.
  • It is important you inform the on-site staff of anyone that could be a close contact. Public health staff will also ask who you had contact with recently. Those people may be asked to stay in quarantine in case they become unwell too. People you have been in contact with will need to quarantine for 14 days from the last day you spent time with them.

What if I start to feel unwell while I’m at the managed isolation facility?

If you develop any symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, runny nose, loss of sense of smell, or fever) during the time of your isolation or any other illness, you must notify the health staff at your facility. Please do this by phone from your room. They will assess your condition and discuss with you the appropriate next steps.

What happens to the information collected about me?

Your personal and test information will only be shared with those government agencies directly involved in managing COVID-19. We will only use and disclose your personal information if that is permitted by our privacy laws.

During the national response to COVID-19, information will be used by health agencies for the purpose of managing the COVID-19 pandemic and anonymous statistical data may be published in a public manner. You have a right to access and correct information held about you. For more information visit: www.health.govt.nz/MIQ-Privacy-statement(external link)

Where can I go for more advice?

For medical advice contact the health staff at the facility you are staying in.

For general information about the COVID-19 situation in New Zealand you can visit

www.covid19.govt.nz(external link) or the Ministry of Health website www.health.govt.nz(external link).

Appendix 2: Travel Plan Interview

You are required to stay in the isolation facility for a minimum of 14 days.

You will be asked about your travel plans for when you leave the facility after the 14 days at the Travel Plan Interview. This interview will take place at the facility within 4 days of your arrival and will be organised by the on-site staff.

You will need to keep the following information handy for your Travel Plan Interview: If you have a home or residence to go to after your 14-day isolation period:

  • Complete residential address
  • Details on how you will travel from the isolation facility to your home/ residence. For example will you take a domestic flight or will a family member come to take you home
  • you require a shuttle from the facility to get to the airport, please provide:
    • a pick-up time
    • total number of passengers
    • oom number
    • departing flight and time
  • If you don’t have a transport plan in place, let the on-site team know what assistance you may need to get to your home or residence
  • Details of anybody who might be picking you up from the facility
  • Any specific requirements for land or flight travel that we need to know.

If you do not have a home or residence to go to after your 14-day isolation period, you will need to explain your circumstances. This will help us get the appropriate agency such as housing or welfare to help you.

Appendix 3: Legal rights

The information below outlines your legal rights while you are in a managed isolation facility.

You are required by law to remain within this facility in accordance with the COVID-19 Public Health Response Act 2020 (or any successor and its related orders). This is to protect New Zealanders from the spread of COVID-19.

A copy of the law is available at: www.pco.govt.nz/covid-19-legislation(external link)

You have the right to consult and instruct a lawyer at your own expense at any time without delay. You are entitled to talk to your lawyer in a confidential environment.

We’re here to help if you have issues or concerns

Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) takes all complaints seriously. We believe that everyone has the right to make a complaint and for everyone concerned to be treated courteously and with respect, and given a full and fair hearing.

We are committed to the fair, simple, speedy and efficient resolution of complaints.

We recognise that any investigations must be confidential and undertaken in good faith.

We will use outcomes arising from complaints as an opportunity for learning and improving our processes.

How to provide feedback

If you are currently in an MIQ facility and your expectations are not being met, you should first raise your concern with the Facility Manager or Wellbeing Coordinator.

There are a number of specialists onsite who are able to deal with a variety of issues including security, safety, health and wellbeing, food and welfare support. You should contact the onsite teams first to help with your concerns.

If your concern isn’t resolved, you can raise your issue by using the Complaints Form on the MIQ website. Which can be found on our contact us page:

Contact us

Complaints procedure

You can make a complaint by:

What happens next?

All complaints will receive an acknowledgement email within two working days of receipt of their complaint.

Find out more about our complaints procedure

Where to access free legal support

You can get free legal advice and assistance from:

Community Law Centres

Community law centres offer free legal information and advice to people who cannot afford to see a lawyer. More information and contact details are available on https://communitylaw.org.nz

Citizens Advice Bureaus

Free advice about just about anything — in your local area and in your own language.

You can contact CABNZ National Office by emailing admin@cab.org.nz or calling 0800 367 222

Youth Law

Provides free legal services for all children and young people under 25. Call 0800 884 529

Appendix 4: How to wear and remove a face mask safely

Wear face masks that have been supplied to you at all times when outside your room, or if someone needs to enter your room for maintenance or cleaning. You must only wear these face masks once – you need to wear a new face mask each time you leave your room. If you run out of single-use face masks, contact the MIQF staff and they will provide you with more. Do not share your face mask. The use of reusable masks and other face coverings are not permitted when you are in an isolation or quarantine facility.

Putting on a facemask:

  • Clean your hands.
    • Before you put on your face mask, wash and dry your hands or use hand sanitiser.
  • Check your face mask.
    • Make sure it is clean, dry and not damaged.
  • Put on your face mask.
    • Place the face mask over your nose, mouth and chin, and place the loops over your ears to hold the mask in place.
  • Replace the face mask every four hours or earlier if it becomes damp, damaged or dirty.
    • Dispose of face masks in a rubbish bin.
  • Clean your hands.
    • Wash and dry your hands or use hand sanitiser.

When wearing a face mask you should avoid:

  • Touching the front of your mask.
  • Touching your face.
  • Moving your face mask.

This is specific guidance for face mask use in Managed Isolation and Quarantine Facilities (MIQF). You must only wear single-use face masks that are provided by the MIQF. You must only wear these face masks once – you need to wear a new face mask each time you leave your room. If you run out of single-use face masks, contact the MIQF staff and they will provide you with more.

How to remove a face mask:

  • Clean your hands.
    • Before you take off your face mask, wash and dry your hands or use hand sanitiser.
  • Remove your face mask.
    • Take your face mask off by removing from the earloops.
  • Dispose of face masks in a rubbish bin.
    • Do not re-use or try to disinfect single-use face masks.
  • Clean your hands.
    • After you take off your face mask, wash and dry your hands or use hand sanitiser.

This is specific guidance for face mask use in Managed Isolation and Quarantine Facilities (MIQF). You must only wear single-use face masks that are provided by the MIQF. You must only wear these face masks once – you need to wear a new face mask each time you leave your room. If you run out of single-use face masks, contact the MIQF staff and they will provide you with more.

Kia ora and welcome home!

Below are some simple rules we ask you to follow while you are in managed isolation.

These rules keep you and others safe and help stop the spread of COVID-19.

Stay in your room

You are encouraged to stay in your room unless you have a need to go out. This will keep you safe from any exposure and prevent spread of COVID-19.

If you feel unwell, please stay in your room and phone the on-site health team. They will advise what to do next.

Mask-up

Wear face masks that have been supplied to you at all times when outside your room, or if someone needs to enter your room for maintenance or cleaning.

Stay 2 metres apart

Always maintain 2 metres distance from others except those who are in your ‘bubble’ (your family/partner).

Do not enter

Do not enter the hotel room of anyone who is not in your ‘bubble’.

Last updated: 15 January 2021